Archive for Charlie Beck

Video: LAPD and Mayor Use Media to Exonerate Officers who Killed Brother Africa

Posted in #blacklivesmatter, #cantkillafrica, Uncategorized, video with tags , , , , on March 17, 2015 by Cangress

Since the LAPD murder of Brother Africa, the community has been told over and over again that we shouldn’t rush to judgement, we should wait until the investigation is completed.

But, as this piece demonstrates, from day 1 LAPD, the Police Commission, and Mayor Garcetti have been justifying the officers’ deadly actions. They aren’t waiting for the investigation to be completed – they are using the media to basically exonerate the officers.

THIS IS WHY WE CAN’T WAIT! We can’t let them silence our outrage with a process that we already know is broken.We must and we will continue to organize and demand justice for Brother Africa!

Join LA CAN for the Skid Row Memorial Honoring Brother Africa THIS Thursday 3/19: http://on.fb.me/1O32aIc.

For more information or to get involved, contact LA CAN at 213.228.0024 or come to 838 E. 6th 90021.

‪#‎CANTKILLAFRICA‬ ‪#‎BLACKLIVESMATTER‬

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The November/December 2014 Community Connection is NOW AVAILABLE!

Posted in community connection with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 24, 2014 by Cangress

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Click HERE to read the November/December 2014 Community Connection.

Click HERE to download a high-resolution PDF version.

Press Release: Community Groups Demand More Than “Lip – Service” From LAPD as the Nation Prepares for Ferguson Indictment Decision

Posted in press release with tags , , , , , , on November 21, 2014 by Cangress

November 20, 2014
For Immediate release
Contact:
Pete White, Los Angeles Community Action Network, petew@cangress.org
Hamid Khan, Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, hamidk@cangress.org

Community Groups Demand More Than “Lip – Service” From LAPD as the Nation Prepares for Ferguson Indictment Decision – and Stands Against Full-Scale Militarization and the Criminalization of Dissent

Many activists and community organizers react to LAPD’s statements related to the Ferguson indictment decision with a healthy dose of trepidation and skepticism.  During the November 18, 2014 Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners meeting, Chief Charlie Beck reported that the LAPD had conducted “outreach to community leaders” in advance of the Ferguson, Missouri indictment verdict. Commander Andrew Smith, LAPD Communications Department, also stated to the press that the LAPD would be prepared for protests and other related activities.  LAPD and other police forces around the country, including Ferguson, seem to be preparing for violence and increased efforts to stop First Amendment activity, instead of responding to the real issue raised in Ferguson – reducing and eliminating police violence and suppression in our communities.

Militarization of police in our collective understanding came to light in full force with the murder of Michael Brown by law enforcement in Ferguson, Missouri and their response to protests by community members demanding justice. Images of grenade launchers, assault rifles, stun grenades, tasers, rubber bullets, tear gas, rocket launchers along with long range acoustic devices, mine sweepers, tanks, helicopters, and several types of surveillance equipment in the hands of Ferguson police dispelled any faith, if we still had any, about “protect and serve,” and laid bare the real purpose of law enforcement in the United States operating more as a counter-insurgency force. This is, unfortunately, not an anomaly!

The LAPD is no stranger to violating the rights of those simply exercising 1st Amendment protected speech and activities, nor to extreme violence and murder. The well-documented “Mayday Melee” on May 1, 2007 is a clear example of such violations – when the dust settled scores of protestors and members of the media were pummeled and the City of Los Angeles had to payout $13 million and promised many reforms to LAPD’s practices. On May 21, 2010, in City Council chambers, LAPD Central Division swarmed a crowded room of renters which included many seniors and children, beating and tasing renters that had waited more than five hours for a vote to reform the City’s Rent Stabilization Ordinance – again, thousands of dollars in payouts to protestors.  On July 13, 2012 LAPD deployed a massive and militarized effort to violate the rights of protestors simply writing chalk messages on the sidewalk during the downtown Los Angeles Artwalk, a monthly event for artists and revelers.

As with the other examples, use-of-force, the firing of projectiles, military grade crowd control weaponry and other tactics defined their response to constitutionally-protected activities.

As we approach the pivotal moment of whether even the slightest semblance of justice with the indictment of Darren Wilson will be served in Ferguson, Los Angeles residents continue to buckle under the weight of similar circumstances by our own LAPD. In August Omar Abrego was beaten to death in front of his own home. Ezell Ford, a young African American man living with mental illness, was shot in the back by LAPD within days of the Michael Brown incident in Ferguson, Missouri.  Are people angry? Yes. But people also demand that their constitutional rights be respected, protected and upheld and police officers be held truly accountable for murder.

Instead of baseless assertions that infer the LAPD is reformed and engaged with indigenous community leadership, we demand they (LAPD) publicly lay out their post-verdict response in detail which clearly outlines their operational plan including staffing specifically assigned to the response, identification of LAPD “hot zones,” and the list of crowd control equipment that will be deployed.

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The July/August 2014 Community Connection is NOW AVAILABLE!

Posted in community connection with tags , , , , , , on July 8, 2014 by Cangress

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Click HERE to read the July/August 2014 Community Connection.

Click HERE to download a high-resolution PDF version.

LA Times: “Skid row activists file lawsuit accusing city of stifling dissent”

Posted in civil rights, Media Advisory, press release with tags , , , , , , , on March 11, 2014 by Cangress

Below you will find a Los Angeles Times piece by Gale Holland covering the announcement of the LA CAN lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), Central City East Association (CCEA), Downtown Industrial District Business Improvement District, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck, LAPD Lieutenant Shannon Paulson, and former CCEA Executive Director Estela Lopez.

Click HERE for the full press release.

Deborah Burton
By Gale HollandMarch 10, 2014, 4:29 p.m.

A federal civil rights lawsuit filed Monday accuses the city of Los Angeles of malicious prosecution for charging a skid row community organizer with assault after she blew an air horn during a demonstration.

City Atty. Carmen Trutanich charged Deborah Burton, 62, with misdemeanor assault and battery for allegedly blowing the horn in officials’ ears during a 2011 skid row protest. Burton was acquitted of all charges last July. The suit says the charges were aimed at stifling political dissent.

Police conspired with business leaders, distorted crime reports and lied on the witness stand to frame Burton for crimes she did not commit, the suit says.

City Atty. Mike Feuer, who succeeded Trutanich, said in an earlier interview that the Burton claim had no merit.

“We proceeded in that case in a highly professional way,” he said.

LAPD Lt. Andy Neiman said the department would not comment on a pending lawsuit.

The suit, brought by the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles on behalf of Burton and the Los Angeles Community Action Network, also accuses police of harassing and intimidating group members and falsely arresting its leaders.

The actions were designed to silence the group’s protests against the displacement and “criminalization” of poor residents of skid row, the densest concentration of homeless and extremely low-income people in the country, the suit says.

“Many business interests and the City officials who support them apparently see the existence of high concentrations of poor people in the area, especially African American men and the highly visible homeless population, as an obstacle to planned business expansion and development,” says the suit.

Also named in the suit are the Downtown Industrial District Business Improvement District, whose security guards patrol skid row on bikes; Central City East Assn. and its former director, Estela Lopez, who ran the improvement district; the Los Angeles Police Department; Police Chief Charlie Beck; and Lt. Shannon Paulson.

“Really, the city should have been helping them fight against homelessness, not put every barrier in their way and blatantly violate their 1st Amendment rights,” said Legal Aid Foundation attorney Barbara Schultz.

The suit seeks an injunction to halt interference with L.A. Community Action Network’s civil and constitutional rights; a declaration that the rights of Burton and her group were violated; and general, special and punitive damages. It was filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.

THROWDOWN THURSDAY!

Posted in civic participation with tags , , , , , , , on September 27, 2013 by Cangress
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LA CAN and the LA Human Right to Housing Collective at the Joint City Planning Commission/Affordable Housing Commission Meeting in Van Nuys.

Downtown LA for the California Little Hoover Commission Meeting on Realignment?

LA CAN IN THE HOUSE!

Mid-Wilshire for Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles Commission Meeting?

LA CAN IN THE HOUSE!

Van Nuys for the Joint City Planning Commission/Affordable Housing Commission Meeting on the LA Housing Element?

 LA CAN IN THE HOUSE!

Highland Park for a Community Pop-Up Market Training?

 LA CAN IN THE HOUSE! 

The people power of LA CAN was felt across the City of LA this morning as community leaders raised their voices on behalf of low-income Skid Row and South LA residents in meetings in Downtown LA, Mid-Wilshire, Van Nuys, AND Highland Park. Whether it be fighting for the housing rights of public housing residents, increasing access to fresh and nutritious food for low-income communities of color, or stopping all jail expansion plans – if there’s a decision-making table gathering, you better believe we’ll be there fighting alongside our fellow sister and brother freedom fighters!

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Members of the LA CAN Civil Rights Committee at the Ronald Reagan State Building, (at the Little Hoover Commission hearing) in Downtown LA voicing the need for more housing and services versus further costly prison expansion. Siding with previous findings of the Little Hoover Commission LA CAN knows, personally, that scores of CA inmates would be better served in outpatient settings. 

So, what did YOU do today?

Hoover Commission –

Ok prisoners to be sent to another city.