Archive for skid row

Post-Operation Healthy Streets with Councilmember Jose Huizar

Posted in civil rights, human & civil rights, video with tags , , , , , on August 29, 2014 by Cangress

Much has been made of Councilmember Jose Huizar’s Operation Healthy Streets. And the plan SOUNDS good on camera – cleaning streets and connecting homeless residents in Skid Row to services and housing via street outreach (an idea that Huizar suggests has “never been done before”). However, when the cameras are shut off and you try to get into the details of what kind of “housing” will be made available, then the answers and talking points don’t sound so polished.

Also, homeless outreach as a strategy has been done (and done well) by many groups across the city for years.The real issue is not outreach, but the lack of sufficient services and complete lack of housing!

LA is “crafting a new plan” for Skid Row – unfortunately in reality it’s really just talking points.

Posted in civil rights, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on July 17, 2014 by Cangress
OCANO PHoto

May 2014 – Carlos Ocano, a homeless Skid Row resident with a known mental illness, who fell to his death after LAPD SWAT Team shot him with non-lethal ammunition. Why was SWAT called instead of the System-wide Mental Assessment Response Team (SMART), which pairs mental health professionals with specially trained officers? (Credit: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

According to the Los Angeles Times, the Los Angeles Police Department and City of Los Angeles are “crafting new plan to help homeless on skid row.” This includes “developing a new strategy for taming pervasive homelessness on skid row, easing up on arrests for petty offenses while concentrating mental health, medical, housing and sanitation services in the long-troubled swath of downtown.” Unfortunately, this rhetoric – both on the part of the writer and city officials who are quoted throughout the piece – does not reflect the actual criminalization of an entire community and too often deadly use of force that continues to characterize LAPD policing in Skid Row.

To be clear, LA CAN has opposed “broken windows” policing from the day it was introduced in the form of the “Safer Cities Initiative.” The flawed policing method, introduced by former Chief Bill Bratton in 2006, has brought nothing but long-term devastation  that continues to plague the community. We would welcome any sincere efforts to shift the focus in Skid Row from policing and criminalization to housing, mental health services, and public health infrastructure. These are concrete solutions to ending homelessness that LA CAN has worked on securing for well over a decade.

LAPD San 6

July 2014 – LAPD officers at 6th and San Pedro after telling homeless residents they had to take their belongings and move on or “they would be going to jail.” (Credit: AARON CANTÚ)

However, the residents of Skid Row just aren’t seeing this supposed “more progressive approach” that LAPD Captain John McMahon describes in the article. Rather, residents continue to experience the more of the same: Citations and harassment for basic life-sustaining activities (like sitting or sleeping on the street); a lack of restroom facilities, trash cans, public space and other public services/amenities enjoyed by Downtowners who live west of Main St.; the business community actively opposing projects that would house homeless residents; regular examples of aggressive, violent, and deadly force; Private property theft on the part of Business Improvement District Guards/Workers; Racial profiling and targeting; and, an overall policing style that violates basic civil and human rights and punishes people for being homeless rather than connecting individuals with the services and support they need.

And if there is a new approach to how the community is policed, why haven’t the residents themselves heard about it? LA CAN has tried regularly to set up community meetings in which residents can express their ideas and concerns about the Safer Cities Initiative directly to LAPD and the Police Commission, and those demands and requests have been consistently declined. Recently LA CAN met with new leadership at LAPDs Central Division, secured a community meeting time and date to discuss Safer Cities implementation, only to have the meeting canceled at the last moment.

LA CAN welcome’s a genuine move toward actual solutions to homelessness (housing, services, ending the Safer Cities Initiative) – and have been organizing to make that a reality. However, we fully understand that just because LAPD says something doesn’t make it so – we will be convinced when the rubber meets the proverbial road.

arrest

June 2014 – A female resident of Skid Row being arrested after not listening to LAPD’s orders to get out of the street.

 

LA CAN Opposes 2014-15 $3.7 Million Operation Healthy Streets Allocation

Posted in civil rights with tags , , on May 14, 2014 by Cangress

On Tuesday Morning (May 13), the LA City Council approved funding for Operation Healthy Streets.

The Los Angeles Community Action Network (LA CAN) welcomes a bit of forward progress in addressing the deep disparities between residents that live east of Main Street versus their neighbors to the west. The City Administrative Office (CAO) report begins to cobble together resources that, if spent wisely, can be used as a down-payment to finally address the glaring apartheid-like conditions that exist in Downtown Los Angeles. We stand firmly behind the emergency allocations for fiscal year 2013 – 2014; however, at this time we cannot  support  2014 -2015 $3.7 million  allocation as proposed.

Community residents, members of LA CAN, have fought long and hard to ensure public health infrastructure would become a reality. In fact, residents conducted a participatory research project entitled The Dirty Divide, which captured and measured the true depths of the problem associated with a lack of trash cans; non-working and too few restroom facilities; no soap and water for washing and drinking; and, a heavy reliance on the LAPD and business community to serve as the voice of public health needs in our community. Many of the final conclusions and recommendations mirrored the items that the City of Los Angeles was cited for in multiple inspections by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

LA CAN prides itself in developing leaders so that we may have voice, power and opinion in the decisions directly impacting us. The CAO report and its expedited timetable robbed our members and other Angelenos the opportunity to weigh in with substantive feedback. In short, this proposal was waived passed two committees and placed on the City Council floor for its first and final decision. Moreover, the impetus to move the proposal so swiftly was nothing more than political double-talk – with the City Attorney informing the Council that this proposal was the only thing that could bring them in compliance with the Lavan Injunction, which prevents the City and its agents from stealing and destroying houseless people’s property. It also notes that in the event property is creating a health or safety hazard there are still measures that must be taken by the City before simply taking personal property.

As is the case with many things related to homelessness and poverty in Los Angeles, the only time we seem to move is when the heat is on. At LA CAN we plan to keep the heat on to ensure that the $3.7 million is not squandered and wasted in administrative costs and that Downtown’s poorer residents get their fair share. We believe that our City is better than the contradictions its elected officials continue to allow in Downtown.

The April/May 2014 Community Connection is NOW AVAILABLE!

Posted in community connection with tags , , , , , on April 18, 2014 by Cangress

web.AprMay2014CC.final

Click on the Image above to read the April/May 2014 Community Connection.

Click HERE to download a High Resolution PDF Version.

And Ya Don’t Stop!: Continuing the Fight Against the Criminalization of Our Communities

Posted in civil rights with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 11, 2013 by Cangress

This week LA CAN members and allies continued our fight against the increasing criminalization of poor communities of color throughout the City of Los Angeles.

t-shirts

groups

AB 5 SUPPORTS

On Saturday, over a dozen community organizations convened to launch the California Homeless Bill of Rights Campaign (see photos above). After an overview of the campaign goals, those in attendance broke out into small groups to outline campaign strategies and create an action plan for the next few months. The campaign will be a long and hard fight, but when the event ended it was clear that organizations in Southern California are committed to organizing to protect and uplift the Human Rights of Homeless individuals throughout California and beyond!

IMG_20131008_103601 (1)

IMG-20131008-00550

On Tuesday, LA CAN continued a busy week of Anti-Criminalization actions at both the LAPD Commission and the LA County Board of Supervisors.  At the Board of Commissioners, LA CAN members were on hand to let the newly appointed Commissioners know that while the Board has changed, the devastating impact of LAPD’s Safer Cities Initiative has not. We demanded a new commitment to dialogue as well as a Town Hall specifically on the Safter Cities Initiative, which has continued to make Skid Row the most heavily policed and criminalized community in the country. Just down the street, LA CAN members joined the No New Jails Coalition to demand that the LA County Board of Supervisors reverse its decision to create a $10 million contract with the City of Taft and instead put more resources into rehabilitation (NOT more incarceration). See the video above for more information. Stay tuned for more information on how you can get involved in the fight. Until then, ALL POWER TO THE PEOPLE!

2013 Labor Day Gala at a Glance

Posted in Event with tags , , , on September 4, 2013 by Cangress

Words can’t express the love and thanks present the day of (and day after) another beautiful labor day gathering. It was truly a manifestation of what happens when all of downtown Los Angeles comes together for food, dance, recognition, and celebration.

Thanks to LA CAN member Daniel Jones many of those moments were captured with his camera lens and photographer eyes. Enjoy the slideshow and stay tuned for a video montage of downtown’s vast cultural offerings.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The “Dirty Divide” in DTLA continues to make news…sort of.

Posted in human & civil rights, legal, Uncategorized with tags , , , on July 30, 2013 by Cangress

Skid Row, Los Angeles–

In April 2013 LA CAN released a report entitled, The Dirty Divide, which clearly detailed the inadequate public health infrastructure that exists in DTLA. Utilizing a participatory action research framework residents mapped the day-to-day experiences faced by residents simply attempting to relieve themselves. Moreover, the report included a set of recommendations that we are using as a roadmap for the work needed to end the public health inequities. National and local researchers pointed to the report, and its participatory methodology, as a model way of problem solving which includes a variety of stake-holders and duty-bearers.

On June 5, 2013 the Department of Public Health released its follow-up report on the current conditions of Skid Row. Current Status of Conditions on Skid Row Report.6.5.13 The report found alarming increases in conditions previously abated by the City of Los Angeles in their May 2012 inspection. Among their findings were an  88% increase in solid waste disposal violations; a 100% increase in vermin violations; a 62% increase in safety violations; and, that the presence of urine and feces increased by 82%. Many of the report findings mirrored the conclusions drawn in the Dirty Divide, and while not news to residents facing the problems daily, it validated the need to respond rapidly.

But why had the City of Los Angeles’ Operation Healthy Streets fallen so drastically?

As reported by LA CAN, on numerous occasions, the impetus behind Operation Healthy Streets was less about the health of Skid Row residents and more about the Lavan Injunction which stopped the outright illegal confiscation and destruction of personal property. Residents have long cleaned the area and pushed for basic trash pick-up to no avail but it was not until the City of Los Angeles found itself in dire legal straits that their game of “smoke and mirrors” would begin. Noticeably, after their legal maneuvers failed to produce desired outcomes and the Supreme Court refusal to even hear their case, it quickly went back to business as usual.

On July 29, 2013 Gail Holland, LA Times wrote an article entitled, “Skid row bathrooms are a perennial debate,”  which attempts, in a lackluster fashion, to posit that solutions to the bathroom crisis are stunted because advocacy groups and various Mayor’s all have had different answers. In fact, LA CAN, the County Department of Public Health, many other service and advocacy groups, and now – according to the article – even LAPD agree that until the long-term solution of housing for all is achieved, more 24-7 restroom access is crucial and can be provided through automated toilets and/or in service sites.  Nowhere did Gail mention the fact that LAPD has for years lobbied hard against additional bathrooms; had bathrooms locked at night; or, that some public urination cases were handled as sex crimes leading to registration on the sex offender list and all the problems associated with that determination.  I would have to say that Gail missed alot in her skid row bathroom investigation, particularly that there is widespread need and support for solving public health inequities in Skid Row but not the political support to do so – likely because of the business community’s opposition she mentions, but does not contextualize.

The only thing “perennial” about this issue is the everlasting attitude that dehumanizes poor and homeless people, and Black people in particular.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,151 other followers